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Winter Instruments 6 FMS ASI
Winter 6 FMS 4 Winter Instruments 6 FMS ASI Winter Instruments 6 FMS ASI Winter Instruments 6 FMS ASI

6 FMS Airspeed Indicator

Sale Price: $404.00

SKU: 3153

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Detailed Description

Winter Instruments

Winter Instruments 6 FMS ASI

Developed especially for gliding, the 6 FMS 4 (6421 - 6423) instrument shows airspeed on a 360° or 510° spiral scale. This ASI fits in a standard 80 mm (3 1/8") instrument hole. Gradations for low and average speeds are greatly enlarged, in order to permit speeds in the ranges of primary interest to be read accurately and with ease.

Black plastic housing, white scale on matte black background see scale drawing for installation dimensions, weight 0,205 kg 0 in 6 or 12 o’clock-position (only mph or knots-readings) ranges: see table. The most popular 80 mm ASI in the USA is Item-No. 6423, highlighted in the table. Other Item-No. may take up to 4 weeks for delivery

TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION - Airspeed Indicators 6 FMS 2, 6 FMS 4 and 6 FMS 5

Purpose: Pitot airspeed indicator for indication of the relative airspeed of gliders and micro-lights.

Principal mode of operation: The instrument works by measurement of the pitot pressure, by means of an open diaphragm cell, as difference between total pressure and static pressure.

Scale graduation:
6 FMS 2 and 6 FMS 5: 360° scale with linear graduation
6 FMS 4: 510° scale with non-linear graduation

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT AND DEFINITION OF THE PART NUMBER

Color markings can be put on the instrument scale to identify the operating ranges and the limiting performance of the aircraft. The type series numbers given in the above table are only applicable to types 6 FMS 2, 6 FMS 4 and 6 FMS 5 airspeed indicators without color marking on the indicator scale. In all other cases, the part number should be obtained from the technical documents of the aircraft manufacturer or by checking with Gebr. Winter & Co. KG.

TECHNICAL DATA

Weight: 6 FMS 2, 6 FMS 4 and 6 FMS 5: 0,2 kg

Indication errors:
a) at room temperature: 0-100 km/h:± 2 km/h above 100 km/h: ± 3 km/h
b) at -30°C to + 50°C: 0-100 km/h:± 3 km/h above 100 km/h: ± 5 km/h

APPLICATION LIMITS

Maximum operating height: 12.000 m
Operating temperature range: -30°C to + 50°C
Operating temperature range: No deflection of the compass needle at any distance between airspeed indicator and aircraft compass.
Overpressure resistance: The maximum indicated airspeed may be exceeded by 20%.
Vibration resistance: 5 - 50 Hz: maximum amplitude 0,25 m maximum acceleration 1,5 g
    50 - 400 Hz: maximum acceleration 0,5 g

Installation Instructions

Winter Instruments 6 FMS ASI

The mounting dimensions of the pitot airspeed indicator correspond to the so-called big standard. The diameter of the hole in the instrument panel is 80 mm, the hole circle diameter on the mounting flange is 89 mm. M 4 countersunk screws are used for fastening. The instrument panel should be flat and fixing holes should be accurately located for stress-free mounting of the instrument. The instrument panel should be well sprung.

The airspeed indicator must be connected to the total pressure (measured pressure) and the static pressure; static pressure is tapped either from the second connection of the pitot tube or by static pressure sensors attached to the fuselage sides. The pressure tapping point should be selected so that no errors are produced from air flow around the aircraft fuselage.

Hose leads should be as short as possible and must not be twisted or contain sharp bends. Kinking of hoses should be avoided in all cases. Hoses and connections must be absolutely leak-tight. The instruments must be protected from water penetration. If the hose from the pressure tapping points cannot be run upwards, a water trap (water bag) should be fitted at the lowest point.

Before putting into service, a test must be carried out for leak-tightness. If the aircraft manufacturer has not given any special instructions for this, our standard instruction for leak-tightness testing, January 1978 edition, can be used.

Maintenance Instructions

Leak testing should be carried out at least every 2 years. Otherwise, the instrument dose not require any maintenance.

Retesting and Repair

The service condition and accuracy of measurement of the altimeter is normally retained over a long period. For obvious malfunction the unit should be subjected to an investigation at the manufacturer or a suitable aircraft engineering company. It should be packed to protect it from impacts and connections should be sealed. Under no circumstances should you interfere with the measuring mechanism of the airspeed indicator. We recommend that airspeed indicators are subjected to retesting after 5 years.

Accompanying Documents

New Instrument
Test certificate EASA Form One, POE
Installation and maintenance instructions.

New Instrument
Test certificate EASA Form One, POE

Airspeed Indicator Markings

Airspeed Indicator Markings

V speeds are nearly always given as Indicated Airspeed (IAS), so that pilots can read them directly off the airspeed indicator (ASI). ASIs carry color-coded markings that give the pilot an immediate reference, as follows. New Winter ASI's can be purchased with optional factory installed markings. You can retrofit your Winter ASI with a color marking kit as well.

VNE Red line and top of yellow arc. The VNE, or the never exceed speed, of an aircraft is the V speed which
refers to the velocity that should never be exceeded due to risk of structural failure, most commonly due
to wing or tail deformation or failure and less commonly due to aeroelastic flutter (usually in faster aircraft).
VNE is specified as a red line on many airspeed indicator. This speed is specific to the aircraft model, and
represents the edge of its performance envelope.
VA Top of green and bottom of yellow arcs. The yellow arc is caution, as speeds in this region may
add dangerous stress to the aircraft, and are only to be used in smooth air when no turbulence or
abrupt control inputs are expected. Design maneuvering speed (stalling speed at the maximum legal G force,
and hence the maximum speed at which abrupt, full deflection, control inputs will not cause the aircraft
to exceed its G-force limit). Maneuvering speed is limited by aircraft structural characteristics. With
the Cirrus SR20 and SR22, this speed is also known as V0.
VFE Top of white arc. Maximum flap extended speed (a different maximum speed may be specified for partial
flap extension).
VX Best angle of climb speed.
VS1 Bottom of green arc. The stalling speed or the maximum steady flight speed obtained in a specific configuration
(usually a configuration "clean" of flaps, landing gear and other sources of drag).
VS0 Bottom of white arc. Stall speed in landing configuration.
Winter Instruments Leak Test

Abbildung 1a = Figure 1a
statische Druckabnahme = static decompression
Fahrtmesser = airspeed indicator
A
zur Gesamtdruckabnahme = for total decompression
B

Abbildung 1b = Figure 1b
statische Druckabnahme = static decompression
Fahrtmesser =air-speed indicator
A
zur Gesamtdruckabnahme = for total decompression
B

Abbi/dung 2 =Figure 2:
Pito-Rohr = Pilot tube
S
zur statischen Druckabnahme = for static decompression
Fahrtmesser = air-speed indicator
Variometer = variometer
zur TEK-Dtise = for the slitted-point nozzle
D Kapillare C zum Ausgleichsgefl!B = D Capillary C for the compromise container
Variometer = variometer

Abbildung 3 = Figure 3:
GesamtdruckanschluB = Total pressure connector
Fahrtmesser = air-speed indicator
Statischer DruckanschluB = static pressure connector
zum Ausgleichsgefl!B = for the compromise container

Winter Instruments Leak Test

Use above dropdown box for ASI
selection and final price

Item-No. Range Diameter Depth Weight Dial
6211 0 – 200 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6212 0 – 120 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6213 0 – 100 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6221 0 – 250 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6222 0 – 160 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6223 0 – 140 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6401 0 – 200 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6402 0 – 120 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6403 0 – 100 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6411 0 – 250 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6412 0 – 160 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6413 0 – 140 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6421 0 – 300 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6422 0 – 180 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6423 0 – 160 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6441 0 – 350 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6442 0 – 220 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6443 0 – 200 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6451 0 – 400 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6452 0 – 250 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6453 0 – 220 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6461 0 – 450 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6462 0 – 280 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6463 0 – 250 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 510°
6511 0 – 300 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6512 0 – 180 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6513 0 – 160 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6521 0 – 350 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6522 0 – 220 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6523 0 – 200 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6531 0 – 450 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6532 0 – 280 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6533 0 – 250 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6541 0 – 400 km/h 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6542 0 – 250 mph 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°
6543 0 – 220 knots 80 mm ø 77,5 mm 0,205 kg 360°

Leakage test on the instrument panel of gliders

Dipl.-lng. Herbert Winter

Leaks in the air-supply system of an instrument panel can lead to persistent indication errors - or even to the complete failure of several aircraft instruments. One can imagine that this would lead to rather unpleasant or even hazardous situations. This is avoidable. - In the following, the measures for a leakage test of an instrument panel - specifically based on the example of a glider's instrumentation - are to be described, although this has already been done elsewhere several times (see bibliography).

The hoses which connect the aircraft instruments to each other and to the pressure-extraction points should ideally be short and straight. Of course, one cannot always strictly abide by this parameter; however, in any event, sharp cambers or nicks should be avoided when laying the hoses. The hoses are pushed several centimeters across the connector fittings; if a PVC hose is removed once, then it is recommended to cut this piece off before re-applying the hose.

In the leakage tests, excess pressure or negative pressure is created which then must remain constant for several minutes when the lines are sealed. A change in pressure would indicate a leak. A suitable pressure gauge is available in any aircraft, in the form of the air-speed indicator.

The lines and devices for static pressure, total pressure (="measured pressure" for the air-speed indicator) and for the pressure supplied by a compensator nozzle (abbreviated in the following as "nozzle pressure"), will be tested separately.

1. Test of the lines for the static pressure with all connected instruments

Instruments connected to the static pressure may be the air-speed indicator, altimeter, variometer with membrane compensators, electrically-compensated variometer and the non-compensated variometer. For devices which are connected to the static pressure, leaks do not manifest themselves in flight in some drastic manner - since in gliders, the pressure in the body and the cabin differs only slightly from the static pressure of the outside air. Yet this circumstance should not lead to the conclusion that according to this finding, a leakage test would be dispensable in this case. After all, this affects the instruments most significant to flight safety, namely the air-speed indicator and the altimeter - the reliable function of which must be warranted in any event. If a leak occurs, it would be impossible to rule out significant faults in the reliability of the air-speed indicator and the altimeter.

The leakage test is broken down into several steps.

Step 1: The apertures for the static decompression (on the exterior of the aircraft) are closed - for instance, masked with an adhesive strip to make them airtight.

Step 2: A branching piece with three connectors (T piece) is inserted into the line for static pressure, whereby it does not matter at which point this occurs. Then, a hose line is placed onto the free connector of the T piece ( see Figure 1 a).

Step 3: Via the tube "S", the air is slowly extracted. It is advantageous when an aquarium air pump with an air-suction connector and a fine metering valve is available for this step. If all else fails, one can extract air with one's own mouth. Here, as in the following tests, one must always bear in mind that abrupt pressure changes can have very harmful effects on the instruments. Particularly at risk here are breaking-plate variometers, because their highly-sensitive measuring element may fail completely due to sudden pressure impacts. Therefore, it is highly recommended to connect a connector ahead of a sectional stricture. (Capillaries or single-use hollow needles available at pharmacies are suitable for this purpose.)

WARNING: If a variometer is connected to the static pressure, then its indicator may not exceed the full scale deflection point!

Step 4: While the air in the lines for static pressure is being slowly extracted, one can observe that the airspeed indicator rises. At 150 km/h or another salient speed, the tube "S" is sealed (for instance, disconnected with flat pliers). If the system is vacuum-sealed, then the air-speed indicator must now also remain constant for a long period of time. To ensure that this is in fact the case, one should wait at least two to three minutes. A leak manifests itself by a more or less rapid drop in the indicator.

Step 5: Via the tube "S", the air is slowly input once again. In this process, bear in mind that an abrupt increase in pressure is just as harmful to the instruments as an abrupt drop in pressure. The procedure for Step 3 therefore applies here analogously. If the system has proved vacuum-sealed, then the original condition is re-established - that is to say, the sealed openings are re-opened and the T piece is removed.

If a leak has been detected, then one must localized the source of the fault. For this purpose, the lines are removed at various points and the available end of the line sealed so that it is airtight. This can occur with a suitable stopper or by attaching a T piece on which two connectors are connected by a section of hose (disconnecting them with flat pliers would also work). Yet this option seems less advisable here, since the hose lines could be damaged. Then, Steps 3 to 5 of the leakage test would have to be repeated each time.

Figures 1a and 1 b may demonstrate the method of searching for the source of the fault. If a leak has been detected (in the case of Figure 1a), then one can initially verify the absence of leaks in the air-speed indicator by removing the hose line at point A and attaching the hose "S" directly to the (static pressure) connector of the air-speed indicator. If the air-speed indicator shows no leaks, then as the next step, one can, for instance, detach the hose connection at point 8 and seal it to make it airtight (see Figure 1 b). If the absence of leaks is now determined, then the leak must be in the altimeter. Other possible sources of the fault are the supply points for static pressure and the connection lines. In proceeding systematically, one could probably definitely determine the source of the leak with a few further attempts.

2. Tests of the lines for total pressure with all connected instruments

In principle, the procedure in this case is the same as in the test of the system for static pressure. Therefore, here. this case can be addressed briefly. Aside from the air-speed indicator, the target air-speed variometer, the target air-speed transmitter, the electrically-compensated variometer and the membrane compensator may be connected to the total pressure. However, now, in order to receive a positive deflection of the airspeed indicator, do not extract the air; instead, excess pressure must be created by (carefully!) blowing air in. Here is another collocation of the individual steps:

Step 1: The total decompression (Pilot tube) is sealed. In Figure 2, it was assumed that side from the airspeed indicator, a target air-speed variometer is also attached to the total pressure. In this case, the leak in the installation is not yet sealed, since in that case, the air would flow out via the target air-speed variometer. Therefore, one detaches the hose line at point C ("on the same side as the variometer") and seals it to make it airtight.

Step 2: In the total pressure line, a T piece is inserted and a hose line is attached to the available connector.

Step 3: Blow carefully into the tube. In this process, sudden changes in pressure must be avoided.

Step 4: When the air-speed indicator displays 150 km/h or another salient speed, the tube is sealed. If the system is vacuum-sealed, then the air-speed indicator display must remain constant for at least two to three minutes.

Step 5: The hose line is carefully re-opened so that the excess pressure is slowly dissipated.

In the event of a leak, a systematic search for the source of the fault is performed as in the test for static pressure.

3. Test of the lines for the "nozzle pressure" with all attached instruments

Nowadays, for total energy compensation, variometers are usually connected to a compensator nozzle. It supplies a negative pressure which Is present in the variometer housing as well as in the compromise container and in the connection lines. Due to the suction effect of the negative pressure, nozzle compensated variometers respond more sensitively to pressure than do the standard non-compensated devices which have been connected to the static pressure. For instance, if there is a leak at a point between the variometer and the compromise container, this means that the variometer reads "Climb" immediately after takeoff and remains in the "Climb" range during the entire flight. (Unfortunately, such an "optimistic" variometer reading can in no way positively influence the gilder's performance.)

In the aforementioned tests, the air-speed indicator played a dual role. On one hand, it was a test object which was examined for leaks; on the other hand, it served as a pressure gauge which enabled the aforementioned tests in the first place. If Tests I and II have indicated that it shows no leaks, it can now be used in a targeted fashion as a pressure gauge. It is even better if an additional air-speed indicator Is available: this would render the detachment of the connectors on the installed air-speed indicator unnecessary. Otherwise, in principle, this test progresses Just like the previous tests.

Step 1: The compensation nozzle is sealed. The target air-speed capillary is removed at position D ("on the side of the total pressure") and sealed to make it airtight

Step 2: A branching piece with four connectors (cross piece) is now inserted into the "nozzle line" at any position. One of the available connectors on the cross piece is then connected to the measuring pressure of an air-speed indicator; a hose line is attached to the other connector on the cross piece (see Figure 3).

Step 3: Blow carefully into the tube. Here, the change in pressure must transpire so slowly as to prevent the variometer indicator from exceeding full-scale deflection.

Step 4: When the air-speed indicator displays 150 km/h or another salient speed, the tube is sealed. After approx. two to three minutes, one can decide whether the system is free of leaks.

Step 5: The excess pressure is slowly once again dissipated. In the event of a leak, the search for the source of the fault progresses as indicated above.

If all systems have proven free of leaks, the test is finished. Now, it is warranted that indication errors and failure malfunctions on the instruments induced by leaks will very probably not occur in flight. The leakage tests should be conducted whenever a modification has been performed on the instrument panel - that is to say, after the installation or retrofitting of any instrument.

In addition, the tests should be performed at least once annually - at best in the course of the annual follow up inspection of the aircraft.

Bibliography:
H. Reichmann, Streckensege/flug, Motorbuch Verlag Stuttgart, 1975
I. Westerboer, Oas optimale lnstrumentenbrett, Luftsport 6/1977
Gebr. Winter GmbH & Co. KG, Standard-Anweisung for die DichtigkeitsprOfung der lnstrumentenanlage, January 1978 edition

Standard Procedures for Leakage Tests on the Instrument Panel of Gliders Equipped with Winter Instruments.
Technical Notices, No 3/81

Preliminary remark:

This standard procedure serves to facilitate leakage tests on an instrument panel consisting of Winter devices. Since the respective aircraft manufacturer designs the instrument panel, its instructions in this regard must be observed, whereby this standard procedure can serve as a supplement.

Leaks in the instrument panel can interfere with the instruments' indicator precision and/or lead to a complete failure malfunction. Therefore, an inspection for leaks is essential after each instrument installation or retrofitting. In addition, this inspection should be performed at least once annually.

In this process, one can follow the procedure below:

1. Tests of the lines for static pressure with all connected instruments (altimeter, air-speed indicator, variometer equipped with membrane compensator, non-compensated variometer)

1. The openings for static decompression are sealed.
2. AT piece is inserted into the static pressure line.
3. A hose line is placed onto the available connector on the T piece.
4. Via the hose, the air is extracted slowly, whereby negative pressure is created. In this process, the variometer may not exceed the point of full deflection. CAUTION! Variometers are very sensitive to sudden pressure changes; therefore, we recommend creating a sectional stricture in the hose line indicated in Item 3 to enable the pressure change in the devices to transpire slowly.
5. When the air-speed indicator has reached the point of deflection, the tube is sealed (for instance, disconnected with flat pliers). If the system is free of leaks, the air-speed indicator reading remains constant for a long time. A leak manifests itself by a drop in the air-speed indicator reading. In this case, one can seal the hose lines one by one and thereby localized the source of the fault.
6. After a wait of 2-3 minutes when the air-speed indicator reading has remained constant, the air is reintroduced (!) while observing the variometer.
7. The sealed connectors are re-opened and the T piece is removed.

2. Tests of the lines for total pressure with all connected instruments (airspeed indicator, target airspeed transmitter, membrane compensator

1. The total decompression is sealed (the capillaries for the target airspeed indicator and the net capillaries are removed on the vario side and sealed).
2. AT piece is inserted into the total pressure line.
3. A hose line is placed onto the available connector on the T piece.
4. Blow carefully into the tube so that excess pressure is created. In this process, sudden changes in pressure must be avoided.
5. When the air-speed indicator has fully deflected, the hose is then sealed. If the system is free of leaks, the air-speed indicator reading remains constant for a long time. A leak manifests itself by a drop in the airspeed indicator reading. In this case, one can seal the hose lines one by one and thereby localized the source of the fault.
6. After a wait of 2-3 minutes when the air-speed indicator reading has remained constant, the hose line indicated in Item 3 is carefully re-opened to enable the slow dissipation of the excess pressure.
7. The closed connectors are re-opened and the T piece is removed.

3. Tests of the compensation nozzle (Althaus nozzle, Braunschweig nozzle, Nick nozzle etc.) with all lines and the connected variometer

The nozzle is sealed (the capillaries for the target air-speed indicator and the net capillaries are decompressed on the total-pressure side and sealed.)

1. A branching piece with four connectors (cross piece) is now inserted into the "nozzle line". The measured pressure of an air-speed indicator is connected via a hose line to the cross piece.
2. A hose line is placed onto the available connector on the cross piece.
3. Blow carefully into the tube so that excess pressure is created. In this process, the variometer may not exceed the point of full deflection. ·sudden changes in pressure must be avoided.
4. When the air-speed indicator has fully deflected, the hose is then sealed. If the system is free of leaks, the air-speed indicator reading remains constant for a long time.
5. After a wait of 2-3 minutes when the air-speed indicator reading has remained constant, the excess pressure is slowly dissipated while observing the variometer.
The closed connectors are re-opened and the crosspiece is removed.

*

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